Mar 2, 2021
AARP Bulletin: Lessons Learned a Year into the Pandemic
Dozens of Top Experts Share Lessons of the Past Year and How They Can Lead to Positive Change for Older Americans in the March Issue
PLUS: A Breakdown of President Biden’s Agenda for Older Americans

WASHINGTONFor a year, our country has been embroiled in not one but three crises: the COVID-19 pandemic, an economic meltdown and one of the most fraught political transitions in our history. But as signs grow that we are moving past the worst of all three, it’s the perfect time to assess what we’ve learned since March 2020 and how to best move forward.

In this month’s cover story, AARP Bulletin spoke to doctors, economists, business leaders, policy makers, and authors around the country about lessons learned and paths forward. Among their observations:

  • Technology came through for us all, and had a “tipping point” moment that accelerated our preference and reliance for doing things by phone or computer
  • The crucial importance of savings was revealed to all, potentially leading to new, better tools and programs to help all of us put more cash away
  • The pandemic unleashed medical research, leading not just to several vaccines in less than a year but learnings on how to attack other health issues moving forward
  • Living healthy and avoiding chronic conditions has been proven to matter far more to your health risks than your age. Are we at the beginning of a healthy living revolution?

In addition, the cover story explores more personal learnings about our future. How can we better sustain the bonds of family, which proved so crucial this year? How can we make the most of our own backyard and nature around us? How is the shift in the work landscape beneficial to the fifty-plus crowd? You may be surprised.

PLUS:

Special Report: President Biden’s Agenda for Older Americans: President Biden launched his presidency with a laser focus on getting the COVID-19 pandemic under control and the economy reviving. But a review of his policy papers, campaign commitments and official website shows a deep, ambitious agenda for many other issues critical to older Americans. AARP Bulletin examines how the president has said he will tackle Social Security, Medicare and other key issues once the current priorities are addressed.

Other stories in AARP Bulletin include:

Fraud Watch

  • Feds Say Crooks Prefer Gift Cards: Crooks’ preference? Gift cards. According to the Federal Trade Commission, theft using gift cards has soared in recent years. “Once the victim reads the card number and PIN off the back, funds are drained without a trace,” says Amy Nofziger of the Fraud Watch Network. This month, learn all about this scam and how to protect yourself from becoming a victim.
  • Delete That Text! Scammers Find New Way to Scare You: Now more than ever, fraudsters are using text messages to lure you in and steal your money and information. The Bulletin offers suggestions on what to look for when you receive a text from an unknown sender and what questions you should ask yourself before hitting ‘send.’

In the News

  • Safer Taxes: New Protection for Online Filers: Looking to protect your tax filing from identity theft? The IRS is now offering the option of creating a six-digit identification number. We break down everything you need to know.

Your Life

  • Clever Ways to Swap Out the Sugar: If you’re looking for motivation to kick start your 2021 health goals, here it is. A new report finds that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects an estimated 80 million to 100 million American adults and is steadily on the rise. We offer suggestions on how to reduce your risk and easy ways to slash your sugar intake.
  • Your Safe Driving Check Up: On average, more than 20 Americans 65 or older were killed in traffic accidents each day during 2018, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This month, AARP offers a unique seven-point assessment to see how your driving skills rate. The Bulletin's Safe Driving Check Up provides a way to have an honest check-in, assessing your vision, flexibility and more.
  • PC Buying Tips: What’s Changed, How to Choose: One of the lessons of the pandemic is how vital a computer is for everyday tasks. But buying one today is far different than just a few years ago. The Bulletin provides some factors to consider if you’re looking to purchase a new computer.

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About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation's largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.

For further information: Paola Groom, AARP, 202-434-2555, pgroom@aarp.org